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Coronavirus has overwhelmed Hull, disturbing the peace in the city and all around the country. What the world experienced in the first wave, Hull is only just experiencing now. 

The devastation Coronavirus has caused on the people of the city is unparalleled – for a city whose average income is one of the lowest in the country, the economic impact has been a blow. With the current rate of transmission being at an all-time high, Hull is in peril with seemingly no help on the horizon. 

But while the media shouts about coronavirus, there’s been lingering danger in Hull that no one is prepared to talk about; a problem that could have a catastrophic impact on every person living in the city if we don’t prepare. 

Hull is a city with flooding in its future; and now it’s inevitable. The risk of flooding is ever-present in our city, and it will continue to be until we’re underwater. With this knowledge we should be acting fast, talking about what we can do to save our city. We weren’t prepared as a country for the pandemic, we must prepare ourselves for this.

We need to scream as loud as we can to get people in power to hear us. They cannot forget about Hull and we shouldn’t be silenced when it comes to our future. The Shoreline Project’s murals will serve as a constant reminder that Hull has always been, and will continue to be, at risk of flooding unless we act.

Almost 90% of Hull is below sea level, meaning that we’ve been at risk of flooding for years and the flooding so many of us experienced in 2007 and then again when the storm surge hit in 2013, is clearly not a “one in one hundred years” event, as many would like us to believe. This could become the norm, and although Venice may make stepping out of your front door onto a Gondola look appealing, the reality for Hull wouldn’t be quite so picturesque. 

The reality is many people’s homes would be lost to the water – we’d likely have to mass evacuate as we couldn’t occupy the city anymore. We’d go further inland, but the water would follow; slowly occupying the majority of the north in years to come. Fighting climate change will help this, reversing the effects of global warming could save us a very bleak and watery future. But change comes with time and it comes in small steps. If we start fighting to save Hull now, we could move that fight across the rest of the country and eventually, abroad, to cities around the world that will also be affected. 

#rca #theshorelinesproject #climatechange #coronavirus #lostcity #empowerment #community #art #murals #imagination #vision #future

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Coronavirus has overwhelmed Hull, disturbing the peace in the city and all around the country. What the world experienced in the first wave, Hull is only just experiencing now.  The devastation Coronavirus has caused on the people of the city is unparalleled – for a city whose average income is one of the lowest in […]

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