4 Tips For Designing a Winning Logo

Drunk Animal has designed a lot of logos, so we should know a thing or two about that very small image that is a very big part of any business’s marketing. For many new business start-ups budgetary constraints mean that working with a design agency to develop a brand is simply not feasible. That’s why we decided to give you the benefit of our experience and write a few guidelines that, if followed, will help you on the road to a great logo.

Catch the Eye

The first thing a logo needs to do is attract attention. How it achieves this depends on the type of logo. Colour is the most obvious way to do this, and a bold, bright palate can really grab a person’s attention. Be careful with the colour selection though, try to avoid clashes and always aim to end up with something that you can use on a range of documents.

Bold and simple lines are another effective way to catch the eye. Use complimentary colours, or black and white contrasting against each other, to make a solid statement on the page.

But Keep It Simple

As much as it wants to be captivating, the logo needs to be able to sit at the corner of a document or website, reminding the viewer of your brand but not holding their attention. To do this it must remain simple.

At the most, include the name of your organisation and one easily processed graphic, or both in one. You’re not Claude Monet, and even if you are, your audience aren’t exhibition viewers looking for a deep and meaningful reflection of life. The less complex your graphic is, the easier it is for those who see it to think ‘hmm, I like that’ and continue to explore and read the important stuff.

Say Something Visually

The best logos go beyond simply combining colours and text in a pretty picture; they say something about the organisation they represent and the people who interact with it, such as its customers. Twitter’s bird for example is an excellent choice of logo given the name of the company. The fact that its beak is open and upturned suggests that it is twittering socially with other birds. That’s a lot for a little blue shape to say.

Let Your Stakeholders Own it

When people see an apple with a bite taken out of it on a phone, they know what they are looking at. More than that, they attach a whole series of (hopefully positive) thoughts, feelings and expectations to that logo. That means they have internalised the message that the Apple brand is giving out, combined it with their own feelings and attached it to the logo, or ‘owned’ it. So, Apple don’t have to write this ‘phone is reliable, market leading and fun, etc. etc.’ on every phone. They just stick their logo on it and the customer does the rest. This goes deep into brand theory, but what we need to know for logos is that simple, characterful and easily identifiable ones are more easily ‘ownable’ and therefor better for your brand.

If you’re still not confident creating a logo, or if your existing logo just isn’t hitting the right notes, get in touch with us and we’ll see what we can do to help. It’s important to recognise that your brand identity is far more than just a logo…